Friday, November 23, 2007

Strike Day 14: One Big Happy Return

Strike Day 14: One Big Happy Return

Today, as the Broadway stagehands strike is now 14 days old -- The League of American Theatres and Producers is being struck by Local One of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (I.A.T.S.E.) -- one show is making a comeback today: Dr. Seuss' How The Grinch Stole Christmas! is reopening at Broadway's St. James Theatre.

It joins the following shows that remain open despite the strike because they are either in said non-profit houses or are covered by other contracts:
Cymbeline
Dr. Seuss' How The Grinch Stole Christmas!
Mary Poppins
Mauritius
Pygmalion
The Ritz
The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
Xanadu
Young Frankenstein

If you're holding tickets through Sunday for any of the other Broadway shows listed below, (click here for ticket exchange policies), your show will not be performing:
A Bronx Tale
A Chorus Line
August: Osage County
Avenue Q
Chicago
Curtains
Cyrano de Bergerac
Grease
Hairspray
Is He Dead?
Jersey Boys
Legally Blonde
Les Misérables
Mamma Mia!
Monty Python's Spamalot
Rent
Rock 'N' Roll
Spring Awakening
The Color Purple
The Drowsy Chaperone
The Farnsworth Invention
The Lion King
The Little Mermaid
The Phantom Of The Opera
The Seafarer
Wicked

Speaking of that very last one, I'm currently in Stuttgart, Germany to see the German language version of Wicked: Die Hexen Von Oz. I only wish New York City audiences were still able to see the production that started it all.

Here's hoping that The League gets itself back to the bargaining table with Local One soon.

This is Steve On Broadway (SOB).

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18 Comments:

At 23 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

The League and Local One are sceduled to talk again On Sunday.
Secret place and time.

 
At 24 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

lets hope that they bargain in good faith

 
At 24 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Local 1 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees says it's willing to meet again with the League of American Theatres and Producers. But the league says it won't go back to the bargaining table unless the union is ready to make a deal.

 
At 24 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

By Jeremy Gerard

Nov. 24 (Bloomberg) -- Thanks to a judge, I now have ``The Grinch'' added to my entertainment options this weekend, here in the cultural capital of the world. It seems incredible that rumbling gangs of stagehands (the Jets) and producers (the Sharks) have blundered into the dumbest strike in decades.

 
At 24 November, 2007, Anonymous autofly said...

Charlotte St. Martin, executive director of the League of American Theatres and Producers, you have said that the producers and theater owners were prepared to do anything to end the strike. But you've set preconditions for resuming negotiations, so how, exactly, do you define ``anything''?

 
At 24 November, 2007, Anonymous autofly said...

Kevin McCollum, producer of ``Avenue Q'' and ``Rent,'' among other shows, how much would you actually save on those load-ins that you and your pals are so fired up about because it can cost as much as $1 million to install a big show in a Broadway theater? $250,000? $500,000? Is it worth that much to close down Broadway at a time when all the theaters are typically full?

 
At 24 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

No Confirmation
From Either side,on talks?

 
At 24 November, 2007, Anonymous PropGal said...

On the league side of the table sits Mr Bernard Plum of Proskauer Rose, a high-powered law firm with long experience in labor battles.

Mr Plum is a tough negotiator, too, something younger, more militant members of the league want in their confrontation with the union.

 
At 24 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

by Renee Montagne and Jeff Lunden

Listen Now [3 min 12 sec] add to playlist

Morning Edition, November 22, 2007 · The Great White Way remains mostly dark as some 20 shows have shut down because of a strike by Broadway theaters' stagehands. A long strike means some shows could close. Both sides are trying to set up a negotiating session on Sunday.

 
At 24 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Please be aware that a meeting has been scheduled with the League of American Theatres and Producers in regards to the contract negotiation for Sunday, November 25th. The exact time and location will be determined shortly

The Union has received letters of support from Local 2 IATSE, Local 4 IATSE, Local 16 IATSE, Local 19 IATSE, Local 751 IATSE, Local 251 IATSE, Local 340 IATSE, Local 534 IATSE, Local 600 IATSE, Local 784 IATSE, Local 927 IATSE, the New York City Central Labor Council, AFL-CIO, the McManus Midtown Democrats, the Detectives' Endowment Association, the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers, the Stage Managers' Association, NYS Senator Thomas Duane, the Ohel Foundation, the Association of Pennsylvania State College & University Faculties and many individuals from around the United States who strongly identify with our struggle to maintain middle class values and understand our concerns for the future of our families Corporate greed reaches far beyond the boardrooms of theatrical producers and theatre owners. The people of New York City and citizens throughout the United States have clearly demonstrated their support for Local One and have stated unequivocally that our struggle is their struggle.

 
At 25 November, 2007, Anonymous RocketRon said...

Hey Steve
Hope you have been having a great time!
And With Some luck
Maybe Broadway will Reopen for your return...

The Producers Can Play,
Or we can walk a few more days!
Its been Good to feel all the support and Love we are getting on the Picket line.

Its nice to hold hands with the stars, Talk with the public.

Not counting Producers as People...
Everone we have delt with is supportive and Really Nice

Happy Thankgiving,

 
At 25 November, 2007, Anonymous BC said...

"We are glad they accepted our invitation to negotiate," said Bruce Cohen, a spokesman for Local 1 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees.

 
At 25 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

``We're talking about meeting tomorrow,'' Charlotte St. Martin, executive director of the League of American Theatres and Producers, said in an interview today. ``We haven't confirmed it.''

 
At 25 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Lois Gray, a professor of labor management relations at Cornell University,
“The stagehands have classic bargaining power,” she said. “They’re essential to the production. They cannot be replaced , and they are a relatively small percentage of total costs.

 
At 25 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

For Broadway producers, the cost of the stagehands’ labor is far outweighed by the cost of advertising and theater rent.

 
At 25 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think the stagehands definitely have valid reasons for striking. Especially because it seems that is what the producers have provoked them to do."

 
At 25 November, 2007, Anonymous Anonymous said...

These are the games rich people play.
Money = Power
Money and power dont play fair!

 
At 25 November, 2007, Anonymous DeckSound said...

Will Our Hopes Be Dashed?

I Dont Think The Producers Care About US (stagehands) or
The Patrons.

LETS MAKE A DEAL
LIKE GENTLEMEN USED TOO

 

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